Phone card online

AllTel Prepaid Cellphone Refill Card

ATT wireless cellular phone

boost mobile customer service

cingular mobile phone

 

 

miss banana

Thursday, August 31, 2006

Saxon London

Although early Anglo-Saxon settlement avoided the area immediately around Londinium, there was occupation on a small scale of much of the hinterland on both sides of the river. There is no contemporary literary evidence, but the area must for some time have been an active frontier between Saxons and Britons. From the mid-6th century, the London area was incorporated into the East Saxons kingdom, which extended as far west as St. Alban's and included all of later Middlesex, and probably Surrey too for a time. In 604 Saeberht of the East Saxons converted to Christianity and London received Mellitus, its first post-Roman bishop. Mellitus founded the first St. Paul's Cathedral, traditionally said to be on the site of an old Roman Temple of Diana (although Christopher Wren found no evidence of this). This would have only been a modest chapel at first and may well have been destroyed after he was expelled from the city by Saeberht's pagan successors.

Later in the 7th Century a Saxon village and trading centre named Lundenwic ("London settlement") [2] was established approximately one mile to the west of Londinium (named Lundenburh or "London Fort" by the Saxons)[3] in what is now Aldwych, in the 7th century, probably using the mouth of the River Fleet as a trading ship and fishing boat harbour. It was 'rediscovered' during excavations organised by the Museum of London's Archaeological Service.

The new town came under direct Mercian control in c.730 as the East Saxon kingdom of which it had once been part was gradually reduced in size and status. Mercian lordship was replaced by that of Wessex after 825.

Recent excavations in the Covent Garden area have uncovered the extensive Anglo-Saxon settlement dating back into the 7th century. The excavations show that the settlement covered about 600,000 square metres, stretching from the present-day National Gallery site in the west to Aldwych in the east. The name "Aldwych" (from Anglo-Saxon ealdwīc = "old settlement") shows that, some time in the late 9th or early 10th century, the focus of settlement shifted from the 'Old District' back to the City of London. This may have been due to administrative changes introduced by Alfred the Great after his defeat of Guthrum and the Danes, or a move to a site easier to defend against Viking attacks.

Alfred appointed his son-in-law Earl Aethelred of Mercia, who was the heir to the destroyed Kingdom of Mercia, as Governor of London and established two defended Boroughs to defend the bridge which was probably rebuilt at this time. London was already known as Lundenburh, and the southern end of the Bridge was established as the Borough of Southwark or Suthringa Geworc (defensive work of the men of Surrey) as it was originally known.

In 1013, the Vikings sieged the city, forcing Aethelred to flee. Attacks continued under Canute, and they successfully over-ran London. A Norse saga tells of a battle during the Viking occupation where Aethelred returned to attack Viking-occupied London. According to the sage, the Danes lined London Bridge and showered the attackers with spears. Undaunted, the attackers pulled the roofs off nearby houses and held them over their heads in the boats. Thus protected, they were able to get close enough to the bridge to attach ropes to the piers and pull the bridge down. There is some speculation that the nursery rhyme "London Bridge is falling down" stems from this incident.